Tag Archives: radon mitigation

The Top 5 Ways to Keep Radon Out of Your Family’s Home

1. Get a radon test performed
Testing homes and businesses for radon is one of the best ways to tell how much radon is coming into your home through cracks and crevices. A radon test tells you numerically what the risk in your home is. And since our kids, pets and ourselves breathe radon gas in and out constantly, it makes sense that more and more people are getting the test done to make sure there is as little radon in their home as possible. After all, if you could prevent lung cancer, wouldn’t you?

2. Get a professional opinion
Even if you buy a home radon test kit yourself, getting a professional opinion is always a good idea. The reason is that first, a radon kit must be done scientifically. Any moving air, pets or kids going by can skew the test results so it’s best to have your results verified by a professional radon mitigation contractor. Plus, they know tricks and things to look out for because they work to get rid of radon all the time. Most of us don’t have that expertise and knowledge to work off of.

If needed, radon mitigators will advise you on what measures can be taken to rid your home of the radioactive gas. They can tell you what needs to be done specifically to make your home and family less susceptible to the effects of radon gas.

3. Re-test your home
Any responsible radon mitigation professional will test your home for an initial radon reading. But, the best radon experts will perform checkups on your home’s levels to ensure your home’s radon levels are still safe. This is much like a scientific experiment, where the scientists will take measurements before and after the “action” has taken place. This allows them to provide a numerical value to represent the radon changes in your home. This matters because it dictates whether anything needs to be done to the home, to get the radon readings as low as possible.

4. Seal it up
A common practice homeowners and contractors will take on is to seal the home’s cracks to keep radon out. This helps because it cuts down the amount of air that passes in and out of the home. The only issue with this is that homes are chock full of cracks and crevices and it’s almost impossible to make sure they are all sealed. Even if you did seal 100% of them, radon could still be present in the home. This is why crack sealing is a great complement to other radon mitigation practices but should not be the only line of defense.

5. Get a radon detector
As the dangers of radon are now talked about more than years past, companies have made radon detectors easier for homeowners to find and use. Radon detectors can help alert you to high radon levels in a home. There are both short-term and long-term detectors available on the market. Radon detectors are a great way to get an immediate reading on your home or office and can also be used after radon mitigation to ensure that levels are consistent – if something changes in the amount of radon, the detector should detect that and give a different reading.

If you’re looking for a radon mitigation professional in your area to perform radon gas testing in your home, you should contact National Radon Defense. It’s a network of radon business professionals that you can trust.

Author: Marianne Snyder
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Radon Mitigation Improves Indoor Air Quality and Radiation Protection

Should you test your home for radon gas? The only answer is YES! Why? Because radon exposure is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers, and reducing your risk is easy.

You cannot see, smell, or taste radon. However, it still may be a problem in your home. The only way to know for sure if you have a problem is if you run a simple radon test in your home. Most radon test kits are performed over a 48 hour time span, and usually up to a week for the results to come back from the lab. There are quicker ways to test your home, such as using and electronic testing device. These methods are more expensive, and provide the same results as the 48 hour canisters do. If you have the extra time it’s advisable to use the simple canister test kits. You can these at your local hardware store.

If you discover that your home does have radon levels of 4 pCi/L (pico curries per liter) or higher, you’ll probably want to take action and have some type of radon remediation done in your home. This sounds more involved than it is, but rest assured you can have this done in one afternoon with results guaranteed below 4pCi/L. This will give you the radiation protection you and your family deserve.

Radon Remediation can be done in a number of different ways. It does depend on the design of your home, the square footage, whether you have drain tile and or a sump pit, or a crawl space etc… These things are commonly dealt with and a qualified radon mitigation technician will be able to tell you exactly what he will need to do to your home to get the lowest radon level possible for your home.

MYTH #1. My home is new so I don’t have a radon problem.

Fact: This is simply not true. New homes can have just as much radon inside as an older home and sometimes even more depending on how tight the house is built.

MYTH #2. My neighbor doesn’t have high radon levels so my house won’t either.

Fact: This is also not true. Your home could have twice as much radon as your neighbors home. This depends on if your house has a crawl space how tight it is, cracks in the floor, open sump lids etc…

MYTH #3. Radon isn’t really harmful, I’ve lived here for 25 years and don’t have any health problems.

Fact: The truth is that radon is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers. Only people that smoke have a higher risk of getting lung cancer. You will reduce the risk of lung cancer when you reduce the radon levels, even if you have lived with an elevated radon level for a long time.

As a home-owner there are many things you can do prior to radon testing that can greatly reduce the levels. If you do these things prior to your radon test, it’s possible you may reduce the levels lower than 4pCi/L. This would put you in the safety zone and give you the option of not having an active system installed.

On the other hand, If you’re handy you could easily install a radon mitigation system in your home yourself with simple guided instructions.

If you’re interested in a step by step guide to install your own radon reduction system, please see the information below.

This guide has been put together from over 10 years of Radon Mitigation Installations.

For More Information Go To… How To Install A Radon Mitigation System

Bob Molton – Radon Mitigation Technician

Author: Bob Molton
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Deadly High Radon Gas Levels – 3 Signs Your Home Has Them

How to determine if your Home has High Radon Gas Levels

Radon gas results from decomposition of of naturally-occurring uranium in the ground. Radon collects in attics and cellars through cracks in the floor or walls. Here are my 3 best tips when it comes to radon testing and mitigation:

1) There are affordable home radon testing kits available today. This is the best first step in detecting high radon levels in your home.

2) Symptoms of high radon gas levels include shortness of breath, chest pain, coughing up blood, and respiratory ailments such as bronchitis and pneumonia. Unfortunately, detecting radon without proper testing kits and no symptoms is that the gas is colorless and odorless. This is where radon got the name “the silent killer.”

3) Because radon comes from decaying uranium, those who live near uranium mines should be especially vigilant in their testing and mitigation efforts. Radon has a half-life of 3.8 days, which means that when detected, prevailing radon can be quickly eliminated. Ventilating your of home and sealing off cracks in the basement, walls, and floors is your best bet. In particular, you should check for cracked seals in basement floors and ceilings.

Preventing High Radon Gas Levels in your Home

The best way to avoid being harmed by high radon gas levels is to prevent exposure. Prevention primarily takes two forms:

1) Ventilation. Ensure that you have proper ventilation throughout your house. Invest in some ceiling and attic fans, and open doors and windows to get a cross-breeze through the home whenever possible.

2) Sealing cracks. Seal off any cracks in the floors that could possibly introduce radon into your home. Use a zero-permeability barrier to keep radon gas outside your living areas.

These steps will increase your family’s protection against radon poisoning. However, if you test your home and find out that levels are extremely high, it is best to contact a radon mitigation professional to handle the job.

Jeff Frobark works for Vetter Electric, certified NJ electrical contractors with 15+ years experience. Get tons of free information about radon treatment and NJ circuit breaker maintenance at their website.

Author: Jeff Frobark
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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How to Protect Your Family From Radon Gas

Number one cause of cancer
It’s common knowledge that smoking is the number one cause of lung cancer and it makes sense. With all the chemicals flowing through the lungs consistently each and every day, the chemicals cause regular cells to mutate into cancer cells and then they spread throughout the body.

Radon causes lung cancer
The same principle follows with the second leading cause of lung cancer, which is radon gas. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radon kills 21,000 people by way of lung cancer each year. About 2,900 of those people were not even smokers. Radon can also be found naturally in drinking water, which is another way it enters our bodies.

Radon gas can be found everywhere naturally. But it’s especially found in enclosed spaces like mines, homes, and basements. It’s a gas no human can smell or see, which makes it dangerous because there’s no way to know for sure that you have a radon problem just by smelling it or looking for it. To put this into perspective of how dangerous radon gas can be to your health, the third leading cause of lung cancer is second-hand smoke.

The most threatening side effect of radon gas is lung cancer. It is the only physical malady proven to be linked to radon exposure. According to the EPA, smokers have an even higher risk of getting lung cancer when exposed to radon because they have more carcinogens passing through their lungs at a consistent rate.

Since the gas permeates our lives quite literally, we are constantly breathing it in and out with each breath. The gas is both inside and outside as it comes from the natural breakdown of uranium in our soil and water. Radon is a form of radiation, which may be why it affects us like other radiation forms do. Since the gas is all around us, we have to be vigilant about watching the gas levels in the spaces we inhabit.

The quick fix
Testing for radon levels is the easiest way to find out if you have radon gas in your office or home. Testing kits can be found at hardware stores or online and you can set them up. You will need to follow the instructions very carefully so test results are not skewed however.

Another option is to have a radon mitigation contractor do a radon reading at your home to see what levels of the gas are present. This is a great value because the contractor can also tell you how to best keep radon out of your home or office. Whether your test results come back with high levels or low levels, they can give you tips on how to best protect yourself and family from the gas. If you do end up needing a radon mitigation system, a certified radon contractor will be able to complete the job correctly. Doing it yourself could save you money initially but the chances are high that at some point a contractor will need to come in to get the radon levels as low as possible.

The radon reading catch
The EPA recommends that buildings with 4 pCi/L (pico Curies per Liter) or more take action and have the building mitigated for radon. The difficulty with this is that many people then think levels lower than 4pCi/L are safe.

The reality is though, is that even at a level of 1.3 oCi/L in a building, 2 out of 1,000 people may still get lung cancer. As a country we still do not understood enough about radon and the risk it poses to each of us. This means the best way to protect ourselves is to go on the offensive against radon.

The take home message here is, radon can still harm you, even with only small amounts. This isn’t being written as a scare tactic, but to make people aware of what radon can do, so they can protect themselves and their family.

To test your home or office for radon gas, find a professional who does radon gas testing today.

Marianne Snyder writes about home improvement topics like energy efficiency, basement waterproofing and crawl space repair.

Author: Marianne Snyder
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Radon Mitigation Installation Step by Step – Save Hundreds of Dollars

What should you do if you’ve discovered that you have radon gas in your home. As a licensed radon mitigation technician I can tell you the first thing not to do is panic. There’s no need to be alarmed because this problem can be corrected quick and easy for minimal dollars, considering what an average radon installation would cost from a radon company. There are a few things that you can do immediately to help instantly lower your radon levels.

Before you hire a radon mitigation company to take action with their radon remediation process, consider the things you can do yourself first. You’re guaranteed to save hundreds of dollars if you can lower the levels below 4pCi/L yourself. Below 4pCi/L is considered safe by the EPA. Many times you can get the levels lower that 4pCi/L. This is possible to achieve without installing an active radon mitigation system, depending on how high the levels are, and a few other variables as well.

Let’s take a look at some things that can be done immediately:

  1. Seal your crawl space with 6mil plastic – This is usually a huge source for radon entry into your home, and by putting a barrier down to seal the ground you’ll suppress the gas and achieve lower radon levels.

  2. Seal your sump pit – This is another area of massive radon entry due to the simple fact that it a direct hole into the ground and has perimeter drain tile looping around your entire basement ending inside your sump pit. This allows radon to freely float through the drain tile and into your basement through your sump pit.

  3. Seal all floor cracks – When you have cracks in your concrete floor slab, it allows a path of least resistance to occur. Radon gas can and will easily flow through these cracks. You should seal your expansion joints as well. These are the cuts in the floor that came from the builder. These can also be a source over time.

  4. Seal the floor to wall seam – Some homes will have a gap between the floor to wall seam. This can be another source of radon entry. Even if it appears that there’s no gap, it’s still a good idea to seal it anyway because radon can and will still come through.

  5. Seal any plumbing rough in – Many times a plumbing rough in is cut into the floor for the homeowner to utilize when they install a bathroom or shower etc… The cut is usually all the way through the slab and filled in with pea gravel. This will also nee a temporary seal on it until you use it.

  6. Seal Penetrating floor Pipes – Seal around all penetrating floor pipes. many time they have open nooks and cranny that easily allow radon gas to penetrate.

There are more things that can be done yourself, but if you start with these things you’ll have a huge jump-start on reducing the radon levels. You’ll need to perform a post radon test in your home after you perform these passive radon reduction techniques. Believe me, you’ll save hundreds and hundreds of dollars if you can get the levels down yourself, without hiring a radon mitigation company.

If you’re interested in learning step by step, click below… Learn how to install your own radon mitigation system, step by step in one afternoon. Save money and time with results. Being a licensed radon mitigation technician, I provide you with the exact installation instructions that I use daily in my work. Get Your FREE Video explaining Garage Attic Installations… Learn exactly how to install a radon system in your home today!

Get Your Step by Step Instructions HERE… Install Your Radon Mitigation System

Bob Molton – Certified Radon Mitigation Technician FREE Video for Garage Attic installation

Author: Bob Molton
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Ranting and Raving About Radon

Radon has been all over the news as of late. While many people have heard about it, very few actually know what it is. Where does it come from? What makes it so dangerous? How can one detect it? Let’s start with the basics, shall we?

Radon is a highly toxic, odorless, colorless gas. It is a naturally occurring substance derived from the decay of uranium, normally found in earth and rock beneath your home. It has also been discovered in well water, and in certain building materials.

In recent times, Radon has been definitively linked with lung cancer. According to the EPA, Radon is a radioactive gas that has been identified as a leading cause of lung cancer, second only to cigarette smoking in the United States. The EPA estimates that Radon is responsible for over 20,000 deaths annually.

Testing for Radon in your home is relatively simple and inexpensive. A number of companies have developed detection systems, similar in many ways to traditional smoke detectors. Another option is to have your home tested by a certified Radon detection technician. The website for the EPA has extensive listings of qualified technicians throughout the United States.

If dangerous levels of Radon are detected in your home or business, immediate action must be taken. Radon levels can be reduced through a process called mitigation, which can include a number of different techniques. Soil suction is one such method. It works by suctioning radon from beneath your home, and venting it through pipes to the outside. Another method that is frequently used is called house pressurization. It works by using fans to create air pressure differences, and thus deters radon from entering your home.

As Radon is a naturally occurring substance, it would make sense to give your home a thorough inspection for possible entry points. Cracks or gaps in the foundation of your home, or drafty windows can be considered entry points and should be treated as such. As they say, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Have your home tested for tested for Radon today.

Christopher King is an environmental consultant and a member of Greenpeace. When he is not trying to save the whales from the humans, he is trying to save the humans from themselves. In his spare time, Chris writes for purityplanet.com – an excellent source of information about Radon detection [http://www.purityplanet.com/radon-detectors.aspx], Water purification [http://www.purityplanet.com/water-filters-and-purification.aspx], Ionization [http://www.purityplanet.com/ionizers.aspx] and more.

Author: Christopher King
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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All About Radon

You have probably heard the term “radon” floating around recently, most likely in connection with real estate. But what is radon? Why is it getting so much attention? And do you really need to get your home tested for it?

Radon is a tasteless, odorless, colorless gas that occurs naturally everywhere in the environment, all over the world. It is a radioactive gas that is produced when radium decays. While there are some areas of the globe that naturally experience higher concentrations of the gas, in most outdoor locations there is a sufficient amount of ventilation so as to minimize any effects that the gas would cause. The situation indoors however, is another story. Inside, radon gas can have a dramatic affect on air quality, especially in more tightly enclosed or less ventilated indoor spaces like basements, etc. Over time the amount of radon gas in these enclosed spaces can build up causing a threat to any who inhabit the space.

Exposure to radon is actually quite dangerous. Radon is a carcinogen, or cancer causing gas. The EPA has estimated that radon is responsible for thousands of lung cancer deaths each year. In fact, many sources have noted, that, its cancer-causing affects are surpassed only by cigarette smoke. Radon is one of the primary causes for lung cancer in the United Sates. Fortunately, in almost all cases, these cancer-causing affects can be avoided. Currently the EPA estimates that one in every 15 homes in the United States has radon levels that are above the recommended limit.

What is the recommended radon limit? What do you need to do to make sure that your home is not full of cancer-causing radon gas? The answer is quite simple. The only way to know where your house stands with radon is to have it tested. Or if you are building a new home, you can help prevent radon build-up by requesting that the builders use radon-resistant techniques. These radon-resistant techniques have been proven to reduce the amount of radon in the air, and they are often less expensive to install while a home is under construction than they are to add to an existing home.

The maximum recommended radon limit is 4 picoCuries per liter (pCi/L). That means if your house tests at 4 pCi/L or higher you will definitely want to take repairable action. And while the EPA has strongly recommended that people whose homes test at 4 pCi/L or higher seek mitigation for their homes, they have even encouraged people whose homes test at 2 pCi/L to look into repairative measures.

There is a cost to have your home tested for radon, but the process is fairly simple and non-invasive. A radon collector is placed in the lowest living space in your home (often the basement) for a range of 2 to 7 days. The only thing you will need to do while the collector is in your home is to ensure that the reading device is not blocked. After the selected time period has elapsed, the collected data will be sent to a lab for testing. Then within a few days to a few weeks you will get your results. If your homes tests at a level under the recommended 4 pCi/L, taking further preventative action will be up to you. However, if your home tests above the recommended 4 pCi/L, it is strongly encouraged that you have mitigation devices installed.

Mitigation is more costly than radon testing. Getting your home properly mitigated can cost you anywhere from a few hundred dollars all the way up to a few thousand dollars. And while that may seem a bit pricey, the benefits far out weight the costs.

First of all, there is the more obvious health benefit. Having your home properly mitigated significatnly decreases the likelihood that you or your family will contract radon-related lung cancer. For many people, this point alone is enough of a reason to take the appropriate action.

For those who require additional inspiriation, it most often comes in the form of real estate. More and more people are becoming aware of radon and the need for testing. New home buyers are regularly encouraged to ask about radon testing in the homes they are looking to purchase. Because of this it is recommended that anyone looking to sell their home have it properly tested for radon and get it mitigated if needed. Several home sales have been lost or had the sale price greatly reduced because the home for sale was not properly mitigated. Today’s home buyers want their homes tested, and they want appropriate proof of the result.

There are a variety of ways that a home can be properly mitigated. The method used will depend largely upon how much radon reduction is required and will be determined on a case by case basis. Some of the more typical mitigation options include:

o adding a gas permeable layer underneath your home (a layer-often gravel-is placed beneath the flooring system to allow soil gasses to move more freely)
o plastic sheathing is used in crawlspaces to hep prevent radon gases from entering the home
o any openings found in the foundation are sealed to prevent gas from entering the home
o a 3 to 4 inch gas-tight PVC pipe is installed running from the gas permeable layer of a home (usually the basement) out through the roof to increase radon ventilation

Radon testing and mitigation can seem like a daunting endeavor, and the very real potential threat of lung cancer can be quite frightening. Fortunately the solution to this issue is not only valuable, it is also fairly simple and pain free. Radon testing is too important to be ignored and should be done, if not for your physical health, then at the very least for your financial health as a homeowner and potential home seller. You need to become familiar with radon gas, and radon testing. So whether you own a home, are looking to buy a home, or are planning to sell your home, you can’t afford not to have your home tested.

Olympian Civil Home and Building Inspections (866) 476-2056
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Author: Dennis Kanakis
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Home Inspection Tips – Lowering Radon Levels

It’s possible a home inspection will reveal the existence of radon gas seeping up through the ground into the living area of the home you want to buy. Radon is known for causing lung cancer, so you don’t want it around. What can you do to decrease the seriousness of the problem? In other words, what do you do to mitigate the radon threat?

Radon resistant techniques can be simple and passive and will lower radon levels when done properly. They can lower levels of moisture and other soil gasses, too. Radon resistant techniques have the additional benefit of making your home more energy efficient and can help you save on energy costs. Save money when a home is first built by not having to deal with the problem later if these techniques are put into place with common building materials.

Even in a new home, radon testing should be done to be sure the level is below 4 pCi/L. If radon levels are high, a passive system can be turned into what’s called an active system by adding a vent fan to reduce radon levels.

You’ll need to find someone who is considered to be a qualified radon mitigator to install radon resistant techniques, whether your home is new or not. Costs will vary, but should be similar to other home repairs you may need to have done.

What are these radon resistant techniques? It’s important to note that this depends on your home’s foundation. Also, if you’re having a house built, ask your builder if they’re using EPA’s recommended approach.

The first radon resistant technique of note is a gas-permeable layer, which is used only in homes with casement and slab-on-grade foundations. It is not used in homes with crawlspace foundations. It usually consists of a four inch layer of clean gravel placed under the slab or flooring system. It’s meant to allow the gas to move freely under the house. Plastic sheeting is placed on top of the gas permeable layer and under the slab to help prevent the soil gas from getting into the home

When a home has crawl spaces, plastic sheeting is placed over the crawlspace floor. This serves as a moisture barrier as well.

Sealing and caulking is another technique. Any below-grade openings in the concrete foundation floor are sealed to reduce the amount of soil gases getting into the home.

When there’s a gas-permeable layer under the home, a vent pipe is put into the gravel and runs through the house and to the roof to vent gases away from the living area. The pipe used is a 3- or 4-inch gas-tight or PVC pipe, or other gas-tight pipe.

If it’s necessary to use a vent fan to reduce high radon levels, an electrical junction box is included in the attic to make the wiring and installation of a vent fan easier. A separate junction box is put in the living space to power the vent fan alarm. That’s because an alarm is installed along the vent fan to indicate when that fan isn’t operating properly.

Your home inspector or other qualified radon mitigation professional should know the best place to put radon test equipment. It should go into the lowest level of the home that’s occupied regularly, such as any place used as a bedroom, play or exercise area, den or workshop. The EPA says testing should not be done in a closet, stairway, hallway, crawl space or in an enclosed area where there’s either high humidity or breezy air circulation. Avoid places like the kitchen, laundry room,bathroom or furnace room.

There’s no way to accurately know the level of radon in the home you’re building, buying or selling unless radon testing is done. Be sure your home inspector or other qualified professional can do the testing for you. You don’t have to put your family’s health at risk from radon.

You’ve carefully selected the home you’re buying. Make sure you’re as careful when selecting your home inspector. Don’t get stuck paying for repairs missed by a quick home inspection. Author David Haigh is a professional home inspector in NJ. Click now to view a free sample report of a New Jersey home inspection.

Author: David Haigh
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Radon Remediation Explained

One of the major health hazards and Radon dangers that are often present in an invisible, odorless as well as tasteless manner is the presence of Radon in a building which is a danger that needs to be removed and eliminated without delay if you don’t want to end up suffering from lung cancer. Mostly, radon gets into a building through the floor and to reduce the risks you can either try or prevent the Radon gas from entering the building, or you can extract it from the building.

The best Radon remediation technique is the one that addresses a particular instance of Radon presence in the building, and so you may need to choose one or combination of methods to get rid of Radon in the home. However, the easiest way is preventive Radon remediation for which you would need to seal all gaps and cracks as well as the joints under the building’s floors. For this method to succeed, you need to ensure that you can seal everything so that no Radon gas can enter into the home.

You can also use extractive Radon remediation techniques, which are sometimes known as soil suction and which is a very common method of remediation in which you need to make use of cavities that are of the size of a bucket and which are called sumps. These cavities can be connected to a pipe network that leads out of the building. Furthermore, the sump helps in changing pressure differentials between the interior of the building and its exterior through lowering the pressure in the building’s exterior. With the help of a fan, the air below the building is sent into a pipe system and thus extracted out of the building.

This may be a slightly more expensive Radon remediation technique, but it is certainly very effective and thus well worth choosing.

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Author: Charles Berkley
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Radon Facts – What It Is And Why It Should Be Tested For In Your Home

Radon is a colorless, odorless, tasteless radioactive gas that is a decay product of uranium that naturally occurs in soil and rock. The 2nd leading cause of lung cancer, Radon causes 15,000 to 21,000 deaths in the United States annually and has been found and identified in every state. Once produced, radon moves through the ground to the air above while portion remains in the earth and dissolves in underground water. It is estimated that over 6% of every home in the United States has elevated levels of radon that may need remediation. The Environmental Protection Agency and many state governments recommends Radon testing. The EPA states that any Radon exposure carries some risk. Radon levels are measured in picocuries. A picocurie (pCi) is a measure of the rate of radioactive decay of Radon. Remediation is suggested if the levels average 4 picocuries per liter or higher ( pCi/L) Unless Radon is tested for, there is no way of knowing how much Radon is present. Some states require radon testing for real estate transactions including property transfer or for mortgage approval on a planned property purchase. If Radon levels are not within an acceptable range within a planned purchase, ventilation remediation may be required before the sale will go through.

Only smoking causes more cases of lung cancer than does Radon exposure. If you smoke and are exposed to higher than normal Radon levels your risk of lung cancer is elevated. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has a Radon risk comparison chart available for those who smoke and who have never smoked. The problem is that Radon gas decays into radioactive particles that can become trapped in your lungs. Over the course of a lifetime, lung tissue may become damaged. Breathing of Radon does not cause any short-term bad health effects such as fever, headaches or shortness of breath and everyone that is exposed to high radon levels will not develop lung cancer, but the potential risk is higher than usual. Radon in drinking water also poses some risk, but research shows those risks are much lower than those risks from breathing radon in the air.

Most indoor Radon comes into a building from the soil or rock beneath it. The Radon becomes trapped under a building and builds up pressure. The built up pressure forces the gases through cracks and other openings in a building and become concentrated. Because Radon levels are not predictable, it is wise to purchase an inexpensive Radon test to determine if levels are unacceptable in a home or building.

What is the Radon testing procedure?

Radon testing is inexpensive and easy. To perform a radon test simply follow the instructions provided and return the radon sampling bag in the self-addressed envelope. All that is required to collect the sample is to open the package and place the sampler in the area to be tested. The test start date and time and the completion date and time are recorded on the supplied data card that is returned with the collected sample. The sampler should be exposed to the environment in the area being tested for 2 days. The cost of the kit includes a laboratory analysis fee and the detailed report, which will be sent to you.

The Report Includes The Information On: Report Date, EPA ID Number, State ID #, Lab ID #, Kit ID #, Radon Level Measured (pCi/L), Test Location, Test Type, Start and Stop Date and Time, Test Method, Radon Health Risk, Explanation of results, Recommended next steps required based on radon level.

Be Proactive. Don’t wait until someone falls ill, or you are contemplating selling your home to test the levels of Radon in your residence. Stay healthy, Be Safe.

The author is the owner and founder of Be Safe Plus LLC, an e-commerce website that specializes in Safety, Wellness, Sports Therapy and Exercise products and solutions including Radon testing kits.

http://www.BeSafePlus.com

Author: Renee Grasso
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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