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Remove Radon Gas From Your Home – 7 Secrets to Save You Thousands

When uranium in American soil decomposes, it creates radon. This is bad news for families when the gas seeps in through the cracks of your basement and floorboards. Too much exposure can lead to lung cancer, and radon is responsible for more than 20,000 lung cancer deaths in the U.S. Annually.

When radon levels in a house are too high, I have seen people reduce them by 90%+ just using the simple steps in this guide. If you do it right, you can avoid exposing yourself to high levels of radon in the process.

1. Get a commercial radon testing kit and see how high your levels are.

2. If the levels are 4x the safe levels in your state or more, stop right there. Google a “radon mitigation professional” in your area and have him come do the work. It’s simply not worth the risk if the levels are that high.

3. Ensure that you’re getting enough air circulation through all the close and compact areas in your home, such as your basements and crawl spaces.

4. Aerate your home further with vents and fans. Put in ventilation fans in your home anywhere radon levels have accumulated and are particularly high. Open up all your chimney flues and make sure you let stale air waft out of the home by opening and closing doors.

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5. Look for ways to generate cross-draft in your home by opening adjacent doors. For example, you may have a second doorway to your backyard through the kitchen. Open that door up and the front door. Put a fan facing out of your home in the direction of the cross-draft to get that stale air out of your home.

6. Seal off the cracks in your walls and floors. These gaps are your entry point for radon gas.

7. Seal off all open plumbing bores and seal your wall seam to the floor. Any area in your home that lacks a complete join is a candidate for sealing.

You want your family to live a long, healthy life, and so do we. Make sure your home is radon-free with these DIY radon mitigation techniques. Remember, if you cannot reduce your radon levels dramatically by yourself, make sure you get a professional. Ignoring radon will NOT make it go away.

Jeff Frobark works for Vetter Electric, certified NJ electrical contractors with 15+ years experience. Get tons of free information about radon treatment and NJ circuit breaker maintenance at their website.

Author: Jeff Frobark
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Planning For Radon Mitigation in Your New Home

The prevalence of Radon Gas in the soils in areas around the United States is an issue of growing concern. Radon has been deemed the number 1 cause of lung cancer in non-smokers in a study done at the University of Iowa.

If your planned home is in an area of higher risk, you should plan early on to install a Radon Mitigation System. In many areas now, a test is required with each real-estate transaction regarding residential properties and this will probably expand to include most of the higher risk areas. In any event, your health is well worth the small investment to install such a system.

Installing the basics of the system in a Basement or Slab-On-Grade Foundation consists of inserting a perforated pipe below the slab in crushed rock and stubbing up a connector into the basement. Venting this pipe to the exterior (away from any windows in your house or your neighbors, preferably up through the roof), constitutes what is known as a Passive Radon Mitigation System. If , after your house is complete, a test determines that levels are still too high, you may have to convert to an Active Radon Mitigation System by installing a fan than runs continuously which creates low pressure under the slab and increases the rate of gas evacuation. So you will want to have the slab penetration in an area that is readily accessible and has electric available to power the fan.

Radon gas is found in varying levels in almost all regions of the country. Visit the EPA’s Radon Map Zone at the following link.

Radon Map Zone Areas in Pink pose the highest risk followed by Orange and Yellow. Click here to check the specific risk level in your county.

Many times the fan is located in the attic, particularly if your foundation is slab-on-grade or crawl space. Also remember that you will want to make sure that the vent through the roof does not allow water to fall down the pipe to the slab below, this would not be a good thing for several reasons.

Designing and installing the infrastructure for a passive system can be accomplished for about $150 to $300. this will save you 150-300% of the cost of retrofitting. An Active systems will add $ 250-$550 depending on the size of your home. Download Build Radon Out.  Your radon system is a simple task but it does require planning to complete the installation in your new home without incurring significantly higher costs.

Author: Randy Covington
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
Provided by: Guest blogger

Radon Mitigation – How to Find Radon Gas and Get it Out of Your Home

If your home tests positive for radon gas, radon mitigation is critical to removing the gas and protecting the health of your family. Radon gas is a natural phenomenon and common around the country, but it can cause lung cancer if it remains trapped in a living space. Radon mitigation is the process needed to vent radon gas from the home, before the radon has a chance to build up to harmful levels.

Home construction techniques of the last 20 years have led to tighter, more energy-efficient homes. Unfortunately, these tighter homes also have the ability to hold more radon gas indoors. Therefore, it’s important to find out if you have radon in your home and if so, install a radon mitigation system to have it safely removed.

What is Radon?

Radon is a colorless, odorless gas that occurs naturally when radium decays in the soil. From there, the gas can move up through the ground and into your home via cracks and holes in its foundation, collecting in enclosed spaces like basements or ground-floor living areas. Without radon testing and proper radon mitigation, radon exposure is extremely dangerous, and the EPA estimates radon gas to be the number-one cause of lung cancer among non-smokers and second leading cause of lung cancer overall.

The good news is that radon testing and radon mitigation are possible to accomplish without a lot of expense. A properly designed and installed system can bring down very high levels of radon gas just as soon as the system is turned on for the very first time.

Radon Testing

There are simple, affordable radon testing methods available for your home that will determine whether radon mitigation is necessary. Basic radon testing involves a charcoal adsorption canister, which is placed in the basement or lowest living area of your home for two to seven days. This canister adsorbs the radon gas and is sent to a radon lab for processing, with the results mailed back to you. A do-it-yourself test kit costs around $15 or you can have the radon test performed by a pro for about $100. Either way, plan on doing the test at a time when your whole home will remain closed except for standard exits and entries, as air circulation and escape will impact the accuracy of your test results.

Once the radon testing period is over and the adsorption canister sent to a lab for evaluation, the lab’s report will dictate the actual radon gas level found in your home. The results are reported in picoCuries per liter of air (pCi/L), and if your result is 4 pCi/L or above, you’ll need to have a radon mitigation system installed.

Radon Mitigation Systems

A soil suction system is the most common solution. This type of system involves installation of a vent pipe under the lowest level floor (typically a concrete basement floor). Then a specially designed fan works to pull the radon gas from the soil beneath the house and vent it safely to the outside, usually above the roof where it can’t reenter the structure. Sealing cracks in your homes foundation will make the system even more efficient. For best results, radon mitigation should be done only by a certified contractor who is insured and licensed, where required, by your county or state health department.

Most importantly, after the system is installed, it’s very important to get a second radon gas test done. Only by testing after the system is installed, can you be sure the system was properly designed and installed.

For more information on radon mitigation and health threats associated with radon gas, visit the EPA. For system images, visit the University of Illinois Extension web site on radon mitigation.

Tom Kraeutler is the Host, Founder and Chief Home Improvement Evangelist of The Money Pit. He is a hands-on home improvement broadcast journalist and the kind of guy homeowners want to call at midnight when their basement floods. He first earned his home improvement stripes as a professional home inspector, amassing over 20 years experience learning how houses are put together, and how they fall apart!

Author: Tom Kraeutler
Article Source: EzineArticles.com

Radon and Your Health

These days, radon is a very talked about subject, but there are homeowners and renters who remain unaware of radon and the serious effects it can have on their health.

Radon is an invisible, silent, hazardous, and odorless radioactive gas that silently enters into your home. Radon is a direct result of the decaying of a small amount of uranium found in the earth’s crust. Radon tends to enter through small holes and cracks in the walls and floors of your foundation, or through utility lines openings, drains, sump openings. Radon spreads rather quickly. Once radon enters your basement it can quickly spread to the above levels and living spaces of your home. Once radon enters your home it can put you and your family, as well as your health in danger of poisoning.

Why is radon so dangerous?

Radon is a very dangerous and hazardous gas because it breaks down quickly and instantly spreads throughout the air. Because radon has the tendency to break down at a rapid speed, larger amounts of radon can be dangerous to you and your health. Radon poisoning can occur without your knowledge and within a short amount of time. As quickly as the gas spreads in your home, you and your family are at immediate risk of radon poisoning.

How can radon be found?

Radon in the largest sources is located in the soil around and under homes, but radon can also be in the water you drink, the building materials in your home, or in the air you breathe.

Can radon levels elevate?

Since radon comes directly from the soil under and around your home, any home is placed at risk, especially those that have a dirt crawl space. Basements that only have a dirt crawl space are at risk to being exposed to maximum levels of radon.

Can my home be exposed to radon if I have a concrete basement?

Even if your basement has a concrete floor it is also at risk of hosting maximum levels of radon.
How is radon measured?

There are radon detectors that can be installed and monitored by professionals. By having the radon in your home under a constant careful eye allows the levels of radon to be continuously measured. This will also protect you and your family from radon poisoning exposure.

If you are on a tight budget, here are inexpensive to moderately priced devices and special detection equipment on the market. These devices and special detection equipment is available in most hardware stores and home building centers around the country.

These devices and special detection equipment is placed in your home for several days. After several days, the detection system is removed and sent to a processing center or lab where tests are performed to determine if radon is in your home, if you and your family have been exposed, as well as the level of radon. Once all the tests have been processed, a report will be sent to you to confirm if you do or do not have radon in your home.

Can radon put me and my family at risk of serious health issues?

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, over 20,000 people die in the United States each year due to from radon related lung cancer. Men and women who smoke and have been exposed to the radioactive gas have a greater chance of developing lung cancer than those who do not smoke or use tobacco based products.

Studies have also shown, non-tobacco users and young children have a much higher chance of developing lung cancer when they have been exposed to the radioactive gas than those who have not been exposed, but young children tend to be more at risk of being exposed.

What is radon poisoning?

Since radon is the source of a decaying process, tiny radioactive particles are slowly and silently released into the air. Radon poisoning occurs when you inhale large mounts of high levels of the radioactive gas into your lungs. By breathing radon into your lungs it can cause moderate to severe damage to the lungs, resulting in lung cancer.

Why does radon poisoning occur?

Radon poisoning has a tendency to occur when crawl spaces, basements or mines are poorly encapsulated.

What are the signs of radon poisoning?

The Environmental Protection Agency has spent endless hours and money researching the symptoms and effects of this radioactive gas. There are indications to look for to tell if you and our family have been exposed to radon poisoning. Those symptoms are a persistent dry cough, hoarseness, respiratory infections, and respiratory issues.

What is the best way to confirm if I have been exposed to radon?

If you believe you or your family have been exposed to radon or if you are experiencing symptoms that you believe are from radon poisoning, it is best to seek medical attention. A physician will give you a complete check up, and run the appropriate tests to determine if you have been exposed to the radioactive gas, and what treatment will suit your specific needs.

How can I protect myself and my family from radon poisoning?

The United States Surgeon General’s office recommends all homeowners and landlords have their homes and rental properties tested for radon.

Solution

If you believe you and your family may have been exposed to radon it is best to contact a professional who can evaluate and properly test your home for radon. This will assure you and your family are safe from this radioactive gas.

Contact the radon experts at Interior Basement Systems for radon testing in Kelowna!

Author: Donna Kshir
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Should You Test For Radon in Your Home?

Most people don’t think much about Radon, and yet Radon can have a major impact on their health and that of their families. That’s because Radon can seep into homes and contaminate the air inside. That’s a major reason for concern as Radon is a major cause of lung cancer, second only after cigarette smoking. In fact, the US Environmental Protection Agency estimates that there are over 20,000 deaths in the United States every year due to exposure to Radon. How are we getting exposed to Radon, and what can a homeowner do about it?

Radon is a gas that is formed naturally when uranium in rock, soil and groundwater breaks down. The Radon gas then finds its way up to the surface. Unlike other forms of pollution or dangerous gasses, you can neither see nor smell Radon. Most of the time, Radon harmlessly dissipates into the atmosphere outdoors, as it has for millions of years, and it isn’t a problem at all. It does become a problem when it finds its way into your house. How can that happen?

In many ways. What happens is that the Radon gas in the soil under your home collects in the void and air spaces under the foundation slab and gradually enters the home. It can also enter through cracks in foundations or even through showers and drainage sumps. Most new homes have much better insulation than in the past, of so the Radon gas becomes trapped indoors. So in this case the better insulation and sealing actually works against you. What can be done to fix a home with a Radon problem?

There are two basic ways to handle the problem. One of them is to install pipes that suck the Radon gas away from the spaces beneath the foundation and harmlessly expel it to the outside above the roof via an electric fan connected to exterior pipes. Another is to run the pipes inside the house or the garage so that the Radon is expelled outside above the roof. In this case, the electric fan is located in the attic, so the components of the system cannot be seen from the outside of the home. Both of these methods are referred to as Radon reduction or “mitigation” systems. According to Jamey Gelina, a radon specialist with The Air Quality Control Agency, “Radon gas can be reduced to safe levels in practically any home when the proper mitigation techniques are applied.”

How do homeowners know whether or not their house is exposed to Radon? That’s where Radon testing comes in. Radon occurs all over the United States, so testing should be pretty much mandatory. Testing is fairly simple and can be done by qualified testing services that install a detection device and then examine the results after a few days. This will reliably determine if the Radon levels in a home are high enough to require a Radon mitigation system. About one in every 15 homes in the US has excessive Radon levels, and Radon testing is mandatory in many states when you buy or sell a home. Even if it’s not, given the potential health risks, it’s foolish not to test one’s home.

If testing reveals elevated Radon levels, a Radon mitigation system must be installed. Installation isn’t difficult and it’s a proven and effective technology, but it must be done right. There are many qualified mitigation system installers with certified and licensed technicians, so pick someone who’s been in the business for a while to remove this potentially deadly thread from your home.

Chris Robertson is an author of Majon International, one of the worlds MOST popular internet marketing companies on the web. Learn more about Radon Testing and Mitigation.

Author: Chris Robertson
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Radon Linked With Cancer: How to Ensure Your Home is Radon-Free

Radon is responsible for at least 15,000 to 20,000 getting lung cancer deaths each year in the U.S. In fact, radon exposure is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. This tragedy is compounded by the fact that both radon testing and radon mitigation are simple and inexpensive. While nationally 1 in 15 homes may show dangerous levels of radon, the average levels in many parts of the mid-Atlantic may be two to three times higher than this. There are no immediate symptoms of radon exposure and you cannot see, taste, feel, or smell radon. Cancer can show up five to 25 years after exposure and about 12% of lung cancer diagnoses are caused by radon.

Where Radon Comes From

Radon is a radioactive gas that occurs naturally in the soil. It is a byproduct of uranium decay. Radon can be found in-new homes, older homes, homes in need of repair, homes without basements; there is no pattern. Your neighbor’s home might be radon-free, while your home has dangerous levels. Radon can come from the ground beneath a home, well water, and various building materials. The only way to know is to test your home, which can be done for less than $30 with a simple kit available at most hardware stores.

Before Buying a Home:

  • Ask the seller for a copy of the home’s radon test results. If the home has not been tested, ask your home inspector to include a radon test in his report.
  • Make sure that the Radon Testing Checklist items were met.
  • Make sure that the last test was recent, at least within the past 2 years.
  • Make sure that the seller has performed the test in the lowest, livable level of the house. This usually means the basement, but if the home has no basement, test in the lowest level of the house.
  • Ask that the home be tested again if any changes have been made to the home’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system since the last test was done.
  • Should you decide to renovate an unfinished part of the home, test for radon before work begins. It is much easier to install a radon system in an unfinished room. If your test results are close to the EPA action level (4.0 pCi/l), test the space again after work is completed.

When renovating an unfinished part of a home or building a new home, look to minimize radon presence.

To Minimize Radon When Building a New Home:

  • The integrity of the slab should be maintained at all times.
  • Sump pits need to be installed with a sealed cover.
  • Use a gas tight radon drain for all floor drains.
  • When framing, run a radon vent pipe from the basement to the high part of the attic. This pipe should not be to close to the attic eaves, so that a radon fan can be easily added at a later date if needed.
  • If a sump pump is not required for the basement or if the construction is slab on grade, have drain tile looped around the perimeter of the inside of the foundation and have it terminate with a 3 inch PVC “rough in.” A 3″ PVC vent pipe is sufficient for spaces that are less than 2,000 square feet. Use a 4″ PVC “rough in” and a 4″ PVC vent pipe for spaces larger than 2,000 square feet.

How to Measure Radon

Homeowners can test for radon themselves. Order a radon test kit and when finished, make sure to return the radon test to the laboratory with all the required information filled out. Be sure to follow the test kit instructions to the letter. One of the most common mistakes is over or under exposing the devices. A radon test result of 4 picocuries (a picocurie is one trillionth of a curie and measures radioactivity) per liter or higher is considered to be a high radon level. The average radon level in homes is 1.3pCi/L and .4pCi/L outdoors. The 1.3 pCi/l national average includes homes in many regions that do not have radon issues. Keep in mind that the 4.0 pCi/l standard was established as a matter of practicality, not safety. EPA officials at the time were unsure whether the technology and methods employed in 1984 were capable of reducing radon levels further. Recent studies show a significant risk of lung cancer when exposed at levels between 2 and 4 pCi/l. EPA recommends reducing radon levels to below 2pCi/l if possible.

If your home does have Radon

Costs to hire a radon removal professional to lower radon levels average about $800 to $1,200. Homes with crawl spaces or without gravel under the slab cost more. Many radon removal configurations exist and include sub slab depressurization (SSD), SSD with a crawl space, and air exchangers. The work required for a successful radon mitigation are beyond the skills of most untrained homeowners.

What to Consider When Hiring a Radon Abatement or Mitigation Firm

  • Ask to see proof of their certifications from National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) and/or the National Radon Safety Board (NRSB).
  • Contractors must also be licensed as home-improvement contactors in each state they wish to work. The District of Columbia is an exception in the case of radon work.
  • Make sure the contractor is fully insured.
  • Have them describe all of the work they will be doing.
  • Sign a contract and see that it includes all promises that were made verbally.
  • Don’t pay for work until it is complete. Down payments are rarely required.
  • Ask for at least a 20-year transferable warranty.

Radon Abatement Services is a radon mitigation contractor [http://www.radonrepair.com/mitigation/] serving the greater Maryland, DC, and Virginia region. Contact them online for help with lowering radon levels [http://www.radonrepair.com/contact.html]. Call 301-718-6200 or visit their website at http:// http://www.radonrepair.com/ for more information.

Author: Robin Meyer
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Understanding Radon and How to Reduce it With Radon Venting

Outside of smoking, radon is considered to be the leading cause of cancer. It’s a carcinogen that most people find in their homes. In order to reduce this, you have to properly vent your home and minimize the radon levels. Did you know there are guides to do this properly? It’s not something most people know about, but there are also professionals who assist you as well.

The bad thing about radon is it’s not something you can see or smell. In fact, it’s so undetectable to our regular perception; you need special equipment to realize its present. There are several different devices out there, but some include; alpha-track detectors, charcoal canisters, or charcoal liquid scintillation devices (which are passive). The good news is they don’t need an ounce of power to function. However, if you want something that continuously monitors radon then you will need one that uses power.

If you do this and realize radon is present, it’s important to figure out if they are at harmful levels. If so then it is time to figure out how to reduce it as much as possible. Your choice of remedies will depend on whether or not you want to prevent radon entry, or if you want to reduce it after entry. If you’re on the prevention line, the EPA suggests soil suction. However, this is going to depend on what type of house you own, because there may be better techniques for your situation.

It all starts with the foundation. Head to the basement and start using the soil suction on the sub slab, drain tile, sump hole, or even block wall suction.

If by chance you have crawlspace housing, try converting the dirt floor with a plastic sheet of high density. Once everything is in place you can grab a fan and vent pipe, then draw the radon out from under the sheet and vent it out. This is actually considered the best recommendation for crawlspace houses (called sub-membrane suction). Then of course you have depressurization where the air can be removed from the crawlspace with a more powerful fan. However, just opening vents or installing more can help to reduce radon in crawlspaces.

There is also the opportunity to use outdoor air and warm it with a heat recovery ventilator. This helps to increase the overall ventilation and minimize the radon levels in your home. While this can be done in any part of the home, it usually has the most benefits when working with basement projects.

When all else fails or sounds too difficult, the best place to come back to is natural ventilation. If you open vents, doors or windows on the lowest part of your home, it can definitely help. Once you’re able to mix both indoor and outdoor air together, it will basically saturate the radon levels. Keep in mind though that they will return within 12 hours once you close everything up again. So this is a short term solution.

In the end it’s just important to use the option that works best for your situation. Whether it’s the various ones we mentioned above or something like sealing and house/room pressurization, they all work. If you can figure out which option is geared for your home, the radon levels will soon diminish and you will feel much safer.

Learn more about radon venting and our recommended radon mitigation system at RadonKits.com

Author: Gray Rollins
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Radon Mitigation Improves Indoor Air Quality and Radiation Protection

Should you test your home for radon gas? The only answer is YES! Why? Because radon exposure is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers, and reducing your risk is easy.

You cannot see, smell, or taste radon. However, it still may be a problem in your home. The only way to know for sure if you have a problem is if you run a simple radon test in your home. Most radon test kits are performed over a 48 hour time span, and usually up to a week for the results to come back from the lab. There are quicker ways to test your home, such as using and electronic testing device. These methods are more expensive, and provide the same results as the 48 hour canisters do. If you have the extra time it’s advisable to use the simple canister test kits. You can these at your local hardware store.

If you discover that your home does have radon levels of 4 pCi/L (pico curries per liter) or higher, you’ll probably want to take action and have some type of radon remediation done in your home. This sounds more involved than it is, but rest assured you can have this done in one afternoon with results guaranteed below 4pCi/L. This will give you the radiation protection you and your family deserve.

Radon Remediation can be done in a number of different ways. It does depend on the design of your home, the square footage, whether you have drain tile and or a sump pit, or a crawl space etc… These things are commonly dealt with and a qualified radon mitigation technician will be able to tell you exactly what he will need to do to your home to get the lowest radon level possible for your home.

MYTH #1. My home is new so I don’t have a radon problem.

Fact: This is simply not true. New homes can have just as much radon inside as an older home and sometimes even more depending on how tight the house is built.

MYTH #2. My neighbor doesn’t have high radon levels so my house won’t either.

Fact: This is also not true. Your home could have twice as much radon as your neighbors home. This depends on if your house has a crawl space how tight it is, cracks in the floor, open sump lids etc…

MYTH #3. Radon isn’t really harmful, I’ve lived here for 25 years and don’t have any health problems.

Fact: The truth is that radon is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers. Only people that smoke have a higher risk of getting lung cancer. You will reduce the risk of lung cancer when you reduce the radon levels, even if you have lived with an elevated radon level for a long time.

As a home-owner there are many things you can do prior to radon testing that can greatly reduce the levels. If you do these things prior to your radon test, it’s possible you may reduce the levels lower than 4pCi/L. This would put you in the safety zone and give you the option of not having an active system installed.

On the other hand, If you’re handy you could easily install a radon mitigation system in your home yourself with simple guided instructions.

If you’re interested in a step by step guide to install your own radon reduction system, please see the information below.

This guide has been put together from over 10 years of Radon Mitigation Installations.

For More Information Go To… How To Install A Radon Mitigation System

Bob Molton – Radon Mitigation Technician

Author: Bob Molton
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Radon Mitigation Installation Step by Step – Save Hundreds of Dollars

What should you do if you’ve discovered that you have radon gas in your home. As a licensed radon mitigation technician I can tell you the first thing not to do is panic. There’s no need to be alarmed because this problem can be corrected quick and easy for minimal dollars, considering what an average radon installation would cost from a radon company. There are a few things that you can do immediately to help instantly lower your radon levels.

Before you hire a radon mitigation company to take action with their radon remediation process, consider the things you can do yourself first. You’re guaranteed to save hundreds of dollars if you can lower the levels below 4pCi/L yourself. Below 4pCi/L is considered safe by the EPA. Many times you can get the levels lower that 4pCi/L. This is possible to achieve without installing an active radon mitigation system, depending on how high the levels are, and a few other variables as well.

Let’s take a look at some things that can be done immediately:

  1. Seal your crawl space with 6mil plastic – This is usually a huge source for radon entry into your home, and by putting a barrier down to seal the ground you’ll suppress the gas and achieve lower radon levels.

  2. Seal your sump pit – This is another area of massive radon entry due to the simple fact that it a direct hole into the ground and has perimeter drain tile looping around your entire basement ending inside your sump pit. This allows radon to freely float through the drain tile and into your basement through your sump pit.

  3. Seal all floor cracks – When you have cracks in your concrete floor slab, it allows a path of least resistance to occur. Radon gas can and will easily flow through these cracks. You should seal your expansion joints as well. These are the cuts in the floor that came from the builder. These can also be a source over time.

  4. Seal the floor to wall seam – Some homes will have a gap between the floor to wall seam. This can be another source of radon entry. Even if it appears that there’s no gap, it’s still a good idea to seal it anyway because radon can and will still come through.

  5. Seal any plumbing rough in – Many times a plumbing rough in is cut into the floor for the homeowner to utilize when they install a bathroom or shower etc… The cut is usually all the way through the slab and filled in with pea gravel. This will also nee a temporary seal on it until you use it.

  6. Seal Penetrating floor Pipes – Seal around all penetrating floor pipes. many time they have open nooks and cranny that easily allow radon gas to penetrate.

There are more things that can be done yourself, but if you start with these things you’ll have a huge jump-start on reducing the radon levels. You’ll need to perform a post radon test in your home after you perform these passive radon reduction techniques. Believe me, you’ll save hundreds and hundreds of dollars if you can get the levels down yourself, without hiring a radon mitigation company.

If you’re interested in learning step by step, click below… Learn how to install your own radon mitigation system, step by step in one afternoon. Save money and time with results. Being a licensed radon mitigation technician, I provide you with the exact installation instructions that I use daily in my work. Get Your FREE Video explaining Garage Attic Installations… Learn exactly how to install a radon system in your home today!

Get Your Step by Step Instructions HERE… Install Your Radon Mitigation System

Bob Molton – Certified Radon Mitigation Technician FREE Video for Garage Attic installation

Author: Bob Molton
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Home Inspection Tips – Lowering Radon Levels

It’s possible a home inspection will reveal the existence of radon gas seeping up through the ground into the living area of the home you want to buy. Radon is known for causing lung cancer, so you don’t want it around. What can you do to decrease the seriousness of the problem? In other words, what do you do to mitigate the radon threat?

Radon resistant techniques can be simple and passive and will lower radon levels when done properly. They can lower levels of moisture and other soil gasses, too. Radon resistant techniques have the additional benefit of making your home more energy efficient and can help you save on energy costs. Save money when a home is first built by not having to deal with the problem later if these techniques are put into place with common building materials.

Even in a new home, radon testing should be done to be sure the level is below 4 pCi/L. If radon levels are high, a passive system can be turned into what’s called an active system by adding a vent fan to reduce radon levels.

You’ll need to find someone who is considered to be a qualified radon mitigator to install radon resistant techniques, whether your home is new or not. Costs will vary, but should be similar to other home repairs you may need to have done.

What are these radon resistant techniques? It’s important to note that this depends on your home’s foundation. Also, if you’re having a house built, ask your builder if they’re using EPA’s recommended approach.

The first radon resistant technique of note is a gas-permeable layer, which is used only in homes with casement and slab-on-grade foundations. It is not used in homes with crawlspace foundations. It usually consists of a four inch layer of clean gravel placed under the slab or flooring system. It’s meant to allow the gas to move freely under the house. Plastic sheeting is placed on top of the gas permeable layer and under the slab to help prevent the soil gas from getting into the home

When a home has crawl spaces, plastic sheeting is placed over the crawlspace floor. This serves as a moisture barrier as well.

Sealing and caulking is another technique. Any below-grade openings in the concrete foundation floor are sealed to reduce the amount of soil gases getting into the home.

When there’s a gas-permeable layer under the home, a vent pipe is put into the gravel and runs through the house and to the roof to vent gases away from the living area. The pipe used is a 3- or 4-inch gas-tight or PVC pipe, or other gas-tight pipe.

If it’s necessary to use a vent fan to reduce high radon levels, an electrical junction box is included in the attic to make the wiring and installation of a vent fan easier. A separate junction box is put in the living space to power the vent fan alarm. That’s because an alarm is installed along the vent fan to indicate when that fan isn’t operating properly.

Your home inspector or other qualified radon mitigation professional should know the best place to put radon test equipment. It should go into the lowest level of the home that’s occupied regularly, such as any place used as a bedroom, play or exercise area, den or workshop. The EPA says testing should not be done in a closet, stairway, hallway, crawl space or in an enclosed area where there’s either high humidity or breezy air circulation. Avoid places like the kitchen, laundry room,bathroom or furnace room.

There’s no way to accurately know the level of radon in the home you’re building, buying or selling unless radon testing is done. Be sure your home inspector or other qualified professional can do the testing for you. You don’t have to put your family’s health at risk from radon.

You’ve carefully selected the home you’re buying. Make sure you’re as careful when selecting your home inspector. Don’t get stuck paying for repairs missed by a quick home inspection. Author David Haigh is a professional home inspector in NJ. Click now to view a free sample report of a New Jersey home inspection.

Author: David Haigh
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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